Accommodating science fahnestock

26-Dec-2019 17:23

Julia Kristeva was the first to coin the term "intertextuality" in an attempt to synthesize Ferdinand de Saussure's semiotics—his study of how signs derive their meaning within the structure of a text—with Bakhtin's dialogism—his theory which suggests a continual dialogue with other works of literature and other authors—and his examination of the multiple meanings, or "heteroglossia", in each text (especially novels) and in each word."the notion of intertextuality replaces the notion of "intersubjectivity" when we realize that meaning is not transferred directly from writer to reader but instead is mediated through, or filtered by, "codes" imparted to the writer and reader by other texts.However, intertextuality is not always intentional and can be utilised inadvertently.As philosopher William Irwin wrote, the term "has come to have almost as many meanings as users, from those faithful to Julia Kristeva's original vision to those who simply use it as a stylish way of talking about allusion and influence".Hedges were identified by means of a contextual analysis, their frequency was recorded in the different rhetorical sections of the 15 articles, and their percentages (over the total number of running words) were computed.The hedges recorded were then classified according to five pre-established categories, and their percentual distribution per category was evaluated in each rhetorical section.These references are made to influence the reader and add layers of depth to a text, based on the readers' prior knowledge and understanding.

Successful academic communication in medicine involves writers persuading readers of the correctness of their interpretations, diagnoses, and knowledge claims.

The results were analyzed by means of chi-square tests.

Our research indicates that the three most frequently used hedging devices in both genres (shields, approximators, and compound hedges) account for over 90% of the total number of hedges used in our sample.

The World-Wide Web has been theorized as a unique realm of reciprocal intertextuality, in which no particular text can claim centrality, yet the Web text eventually produces an image of a community—the group of people who write and read the text using specific discursive strategies.

Take for example the Dictionary of the Khazars by Milorad Pavić.

Successful academic communication in medicine involves writers persuading readers of the correctness of their interpretations, diagnoses, and knowledge claims.

The results were analyzed by means of chi-square tests.

Our research indicates that the three most frequently used hedging devices in both genres (shields, approximators, and compound hedges) account for over 90% of the total number of hedges used in our sample.

The World-Wide Web has been theorized as a unique realm of reciprocal intertextuality, in which no particular text can claim centrality, yet the Web text eventually produces an image of a community—the group of people who write and read the text using specific discursive strategies.

Take for example the Dictionary of the Khazars by Milorad Pavić.

Whereas a redaction critic would use such intertextuality to argue for a particular order and process of the authorship of the books in question, literary criticism takes a synchronic view that deals with the texts in their final form, as an interconnected body of literature.