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Brian Friesen, who read two scriptures at the service, said there are six people who are still alive because of his donation.“He’s a hero,” said the family friend.Boulet’s organ donation has also led to a national surge in people signing their donor cards.On the day of the crash, Boulet’s parents, Bernie and Toby, were among the first families to arrive at a Nipawin church where people gathered after the crash.

Hinz was the volunteer stats collector for the team and, on Saturday, hundreds of people turned out to pay their final respects.“Brody was a gift to Humboldt,” Popoff told the service.“Brody enjoyed watching Ron Mac Lean and Don Cherry on ’Coach’s Corner.’ Brody would have been fascinated by the love and outpouring of support for the Humboldt Broncos.”A two-sport Special Olympian — bowling and floor hockey — Hinz had Asperger’s syndrome, a high-functioning form of autism. He compiled statistics for his beloved Broncos, and the gig allowed him to travel with the team.During the rest of the service, his empathy and kindness was on full display as family and friends remembered him. Hardworking but balanced.”Doug Paisley, one of Logan’s minor hockey coaches, said he was always a major contributor to the team.“You talk about a team guy and team first — that was him,” he said.Jared Heidinger, a teacher at Lethbridge’s Winston Churchill High School, said he started noticing traits in students that he wanted his own children to have.“Logan was one of those kids,” he said. “I’m not sure I’ve ever coached a better person.”Boulet was also remembered for his quick wit, his kindness and his ability to build lasting relationships.Toby Boulet and former students give the Churchill Victory Song during the funeral for Logan Boulet at Nicholas Sheran Ice centre in Lethbridge, Ab., on Saturday April 14, 2018 for Logan Boulet’s funeral.Leah Hennel/Postmedia Darcy Haugan, 42, was remembered Saturday not just as the head coach of the Humboldt Broncos, but as a family man who led by example on and off the ice.“Today marks just over a week since a terrible tragedy struck this community.

Hinz was the volunteer stats collector for the team and, on Saturday, hundreds of people turned out to pay their final respects.“Brody was a gift to Humboldt,” Popoff told the service.“Brody enjoyed watching Ron Mac Lean and Don Cherry on ’Coach’s Corner.’ Brody would have been fascinated by the love and outpouring of support for the Humboldt Broncos.”A two-sport Special Olympian — bowling and floor hockey — Hinz had Asperger’s syndrome, a high-functioning form of autism. He compiled statistics for his beloved Broncos, and the gig allowed him to travel with the team.During the rest of the service, his empathy and kindness was on full display as family and friends remembered him. Hardworking but balanced.”Doug Paisley, one of Logan’s minor hockey coaches, said he was always a major contributor to the team.“You talk about a team guy and team first — that was him,” he said.Jared Heidinger, a teacher at Lethbridge’s Winston Churchill High School, said he started noticing traits in students that he wanted his own children to have.“Logan was one of those kids,” he said. “I’m not sure I’ve ever coached a better person.”Boulet was also remembered for his quick wit, his kindness and his ability to build lasting relationships.Toby Boulet and former students give the Churchill Victory Song during the funeral for Logan Boulet at Nicholas Sheran Ice centre in Lethbridge, Ab., on Saturday April 14, 2018 for Logan Boulet’s funeral.Leah Hennel/Postmedia Darcy Haugan, 42, was remembered Saturday not just as the head coach of the Humboldt Broncos, but as a family man who led by example on and off the ice.“Today marks just over a week since a terrible tragedy struck this community.“We’d always talk CFL football even though he was a 49ers fan.