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20-May-2020 23:57

Comments from the rater or the raters rater are the most important part of the EPR.Promotion board members depend on this section of the EPR to provide the most revealing information about the individual they are evaluating.In this "Through the Looking Glass" world of Air Force Performance Report english, up is down, hot is cold, and always means never.To give you an idea of how positive sounding descriptions can telegraph not-so-good performance, check out this ranking of promotion statements taken from a popular and authoritative Air Force Eval guide: Who would have ever thought that these 4th-level bullet statements are appropriate for the lowest level of performance?! I would have been happy to have seen any of these statements in my EPR!They are aware of the code and know that the graduations of performance documented here are universally understood.Although an Airman may have received a standard -5- EPR, the promotion statement will relegate the Airman to one of several stratums.

It's a very common way of describing inferior or lackluster performance. The reasoning behind this is that supposedly, if the ratee had actually been successful in his or her endeavors, the rater would have written "achieved perfection in all he does" or "reached perfection".

Thanks to SMSgt T for pointing out this misleading area. Any NCO reading this promotion statement would understand its meaning immediately: the rater doesn't believe this troop should be promoted. This phrase, "potential to be", is understood to mean that, although you have the capability of someday being an outstanding Airman, you are not one now.

Even though the rater is complimentary and even orders a promotion, this statement really says that SSgt Smith is not a good first-line maintainer now but will be one day (sometime in the distant future probably). And just why you're not one now we're left to wonder. Although the supervisor did write, "promote", he qualified it with "with peers".

By saying "continue to challenge...", the rater is suggesting that he needs more practice at whatever it is he's currently doing. In real life, meeting standards is a good thing but in the secret code of the EPR, it's about as bad as being a sex offender.

Air Force people always exceed standards or maybe even invent their own.

It's a very common way of describing inferior or lackluster performance. The reasoning behind this is that supposedly, if the ratee had actually been successful in his or her endeavors, the rater would have written "achieved perfection in all he does" or "reached perfection".

Thanks to SMSgt T for pointing out this misleading area. Any NCO reading this promotion statement would understand its meaning immediately: the rater doesn't believe this troop should be promoted. This phrase, "potential to be", is understood to mean that, although you have the capability of someday being an outstanding Airman, you are not one now.

Even though the rater is complimentary and even orders a promotion, this statement really says that SSgt Smith is not a good first-line maintainer now but will be one day (sometime in the distant future probably). And just why you're not one now we're left to wonder. Although the supervisor did write, "promote", he qualified it with "with peers".

By saying "continue to challenge...", the rater is suggesting that he needs more practice at whatever it is he's currently doing. In real life, meeting standards is a good thing but in the secret code of the EPR, it's about as bad as being a sex offender.

Air Force people always exceed standards or maybe even invent their own.

If the rater had thought that the Airman was capable of bigger projects with more responsibility, he would have stated something along those lines.