Dating in armenian culture

20-Oct-2019 06:23

it's funny when i run into people from that school, they're still hanging out with the same small group of friends - which isn't a bad thing in and of itself (i still have one or two friends from my time there) but it's an indication of that insular behavior that's groomed from a young age.i mean that, or it's just we're notoriously bad drivers when we think we're the shit in our benzes and BMWs.

As someone who is half-armenian whose Dad grew up in LA/ I sort of did - coming back to LA made me wish my last name didn't end in ian sometimes.

It can hardly be translated and it shows tender attitude to the interlocutor, so do not be surprised if you hear your name in conjunction with “jan”.

Another very colorful expression of tenderness, and sometimes compassion, is the phrase “tsavt tanem”, which literally translates as “I will take your pain on myself.”So these are Armenians sometimes direct, but kind, tender and attentive.

The culture and customs of Armenians have formed for centuries.

A bit hot-tempered but open-hearted and good-natured, Armenians are famous for their kindness and hospitality, respect for adults, strong family values and gentle attitude to children.

to hold onto every bit of our culture which they (rightly) feel has been threatened in the past - but they take it to an extreme that isn't considerate of others' potentially differing viewpoints (not to mention certain practices that are just plain archaic)might just be my personal experience, but i went to armenian school for 8 years and towards the end, started dressing differently, listening to different music, picking up different interests than the crowd and i was stigmatized for it - eventually leading to my expulsion (that's not to say i'm completely a victim here, my reaction to them wasn't all that pretty and i definitely rebelled).If anyone needs any help in the street or in public transport hardly any Armenian will remain indifferent.Here you will often hear the word “merci”, which is borrowed from French and is often used instead of the long Armenian “shnorakalutsyun,” which also means “thank you.” And the endearment word “jan” is out of the question, you will hear it all the time!And you can get acquainted with the culture and customs of both Armenia and Georgia together with our Classical Tour in Armenia and Georgia.Since I moved to LA last year I've noticed a very vocal disdain for Armenians.

to hold onto every bit of our culture which they (rightly) feel has been threatened in the past - but they take it to an extreme that isn't considerate of others' potentially differing viewpoints (not to mention certain practices that are just plain archaic)might just be my personal experience, but i went to armenian school for 8 years and towards the end, started dressing differently, listening to different music, picking up different interests than the crowd and i was stigmatized for it - eventually leading to my expulsion (that's not to say i'm completely a victim here, my reaction to them wasn't all that pretty and i definitely rebelled).If anyone needs any help in the street or in public transport hardly any Armenian will remain indifferent.Here you will often hear the word “merci”, which is borrowed from French and is often used instead of the long Armenian “shnorakalutsyun,” which also means “thank you.” And the endearment word “jan” is out of the question, you will hear it all the time!And you can get acquainted with the culture and customs of both Armenia and Georgia together with our Classical Tour in Armenia and Georgia.Since I moved to LA last year I've noticed a very vocal disdain for Armenians.Come to Armenia and you will be able to learn about these and many others interesting and unique traditions of the locals!