Dating in the dark kat

15-Feb-2020 11:02

When the list is concluded, the colonel intends to return to Boston where he’ll kill himself and end his hopeless, useless life as a blind man.

O’Donnell’s experience in NYC with Pacino is hardly what he anticipates, however.

Fortunately, this is not the case when it comes to The Bold Type's trio.

No matter how many ups and downs Jane (a writer), Kat (a social media editor), and Sutton (a fashion assistant) face, I never once find myself doubting how genuine the bond between them really is.

That might have been the end of their friendship or kicked off a multiple-episode-long arc about the resulting feud in any other show, but the three BFFs make up the next morning like regular, IRL adults who share an authentic affection for each other.

The moment, though not even a major plot point, struck me with its subtlety.

The story, briefly: A cantankerous, depressed, blind Army Lieutenant Colonel Frank Slade (Al Pacino) hires a timid 17-year-old prep student Charlie Simms (a young Chris O’Donnell) to aid in the completion of his bucket list – one more fling – an escape from the colonel’s isolated life in Boston to New York City where O’Donnell will “babysit” the colonel (Pacino) over Thanksgiving.

5, has its own fair share of mistakes, but it's Jane, Sutton, and Kat's "we're in this together" mentality that buoys some of the weaker plotlines.

Actually, it's the friendship between them that made me fall so hard for The Bold Type in the first place.

No matter where you are in your divorce journey, this gem will awaken the zest for life that divorce can suck right out of you. Give yourself a gift and watch these two highlights from the colonel’s notorious bucket list before his proposed suicide. Those first brave steps are the inauguration of your new life. Now, go grab some popcorn, crawl under your most comfy throw, and enjoy the show.

You’ll giggle with joy, cry for the tragedy, and be stunned by the film’s wisdom: Life is always worth living, no matter how devastating it seems to be.

The story, briefly: A cantankerous, depressed, blind Army Lieutenant Colonel Frank Slade (Al Pacino) hires a timid 17-year-old prep student Charlie Simms (a young Chris O’Donnell) to aid in the completion of his bucket list – one more fling – an escape from the colonel’s isolated life in Boston to New York City where O’Donnell will “babysit” the colonel (Pacino) over Thanksgiving.

5, has its own fair share of mistakes, but it's Jane, Sutton, and Kat's "we're in this together" mentality that buoys some of the weaker plotlines.

Actually, it's the friendship between them that made me fall so hard for The Bold Type in the first place.

No matter where you are in your divorce journey, this gem will awaken the zest for life that divorce can suck right out of you. Give yourself a gift and watch these two highlights from the colonel’s notorious bucket list before his proposed suicide. Those first brave steps are the inauguration of your new life. Now, go grab some popcorn, crawl under your most comfy throw, and enjoy the show.

You’ll giggle with joy, cry for the tragedy, and be stunned by the film’s wisdom: Life is always worth living, no matter how devastating it seems to be.

The undead can really screw up your senior year ...