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23-Oct-2019 04:19

Nevertheless, he was perhaps Christianity's most important early convert and the first major missionary to preach the Christian gospel to non-Jewish people. What made him different from other early disciples?

Unlike Jesus' other early followers, who were mostly Palestinians, Paul was a Roman citizen, which implies he was at least moderately well-off, and which granted him a certain respect wherever he went in the empire. After his conversion, he traveled extensively through most of the Mediterranean world. Acts says that in his younger days, Saul was involved in persecuting Jewish followers of Jesus because he believed they were heretics (Acts 22:4-5). According to Acts 9, 22 and 26, a conversion experience.

Luke and Demas are with Paul in Col , but in 2 Tim -11 Demas "has forsaken" Paul and only Luke remains with him.

Paul says in the past tense in 2 Tim that "Tychicus I have sent to Ephesus", while in Col 4:7 and Eph -22 Tychicus is being sent.

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There is no consensus on who wrote Colossians and 2 Thessalonians.

These circumstances can only have come about after the upbeat end of the account in the book of Acts.

Therefore, we should consider 2 Timothy to be chronologically the last letter of Paul that appears in the Bible, written around 63 A.

Pauline writings indicate that he was raised Jewish and became a Pharisee (Romans 11:1, Phil 3:5).

However, the New Testament records that Paul did interact with many of the original disciples, especially in Jerusalem. Most scholars believe so, though they have argued about his commitment to Judaism both before and after his conversion to Christianity.

There is no consensus on who wrote Colossians and 2 Thessalonians.

These circumstances can only have come about after the upbeat end of the account in the book of Acts.

Therefore, we should consider 2 Timothy to be chronologically the last letter of Paul that appears in the Bible, written around 63 A.

Pauline writings indicate that he was raised Jewish and became a Pharisee (Romans 11:1, Phil 3:5).

However, the New Testament records that Paul did interact with many of the original disciples, especially in Jerusalem. Most scholars believe so, though they have argued about his commitment to Judaism both before and after his conversion to Christianity.

Home Introduction Gallery Motives Overview and Timeline Destruction of Jerusalem Matthew Mark Luke John Acts Romans 1 and 2 Corinthians Galatians Ephesians Phillippians Colossians 1 and 2 Thessalonians 1 and 2 Timothy Titus Philemon Hebrews The Epistle of James 1 and 2Peter 1, 2 and 3 John 1 and 2Peter Revelation Manuscripts Church Fathers Links Dating the Old Testament 1 and 2 Timothy are letters written by Paul not to a particular church, but to his apprentice, Timothy.