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24-Oct-2019 20:14

(The masculine pronoun here is appropriate because, according to the Workplace Bullying Institute, most bully bosses are men.) Or maybe some employees ask for it, just a little, through their abject performance and dubious hygiene. Surely that would soften even the flintiest boss’s stony heart? Hurst said even more “heroic” efforts by employees to act like good corporate citizens usually fail to appease bullying bosses.But for anyone forced to deal with an abusive supervisor, the obvious question is: How do you stop it? Hurst and her fellow researchers spent six months talking to 244 employees in a range of organizations to observe how people’s interactions with an abusive supervisor affected the relationship. That may say something not only about the general character of bullies, but also about the changing nature of work in the U.“If your boss’s behavior could endanger customers, employees, or the business, then you have an obligation to tell someone,” Marie Mc Intyre- author of Secrets to Winning at Office Politics. Even if your boss is an intimidating jerk, and everyone agrees, you still can’t play victim to that.

Although it might not make a boss any less abusive, the researchers did find that some employees took comfort in at least telling the offending supervisor that they don’t appreciate being flogged.

You managed to bag the job that you always wanted but have no idea what to do, how to proceed, how to behave and handle stressful situations in your new office.

Not everyone is lucky enough to have a boss who can guide you throughout so that your initial step into the working world is smooth. The sight of your manager leaves you scared and dreaded.

In honor of “National Boss’s Day,” let’s take a moment to recognize all the hardworking CEOs, managers, supervisors, (ahem, editors) and other fearless leaders out there who do their utmost every day of the week -- nights, too, and even weekends -- to make the rest of us well and truly miserable.

Abusive bosses have a range of reasons to beat up on employees, said Charlice Hurst, an assistant professor at the University of Notre Dame’s Mendoza College of Business and co-author of a recent study that explores the dynamics of bullying in the workplace.

Although it might not make a boss any less abusive, the researchers did find that some employees took comfort in at least telling the offending supervisor that they don’t appreciate being flogged.

You managed to bag the job that you always wanted but have no idea what to do, how to proceed, how to behave and handle stressful situations in your new office.

Not everyone is lucky enough to have a boss who can guide you throughout so that your initial step into the working world is smooth. The sight of your manager leaves you scared and dreaded.

In honor of “National Boss’s Day,” let’s take a moment to recognize all the hardworking CEOs, managers, supervisors, (ahem, editors) and other fearless leaders out there who do their utmost every day of the week -- nights, too, and even weekends -- to make the rest of us well and truly miserable.

Abusive bosses have a range of reasons to beat up on employees, said Charlice Hurst, an assistant professor at the University of Notre Dame’s Mendoza College of Business and co-author of a recent study that explores the dynamics of bullying in the workplace.

You also have to make sure you don’t seem like some kind of brown-noser to your peers.