Painting at bamyan in afghanistan predating european oil painting

17-Oct-2019 23:46

A monumental seated Buddha, similar in style to those at Bamiyan, still exists in the Bingling Temple caves in China's Gansu province.

The destruction of the Bamyan Buddhas became a symbol of oppression and a rallying point for the freedom of religious expression.

Historic documentation refers to celebrations held every year attracting numerous pilgrims and that offers were made to the monumental statues (

They were perhaps the most famous cultural landmarks of the region, and the site was listed by UNESCO as a World Heritage Site along with the surrounding cultural landscape and archaeological remains of the Bamiyan Valley. and described Bamiyan in the Da Tang Xiyu Ji as a flourishing Buddhist center "with more than ten monasteries and more than a thousand monks".

Rows of holes that can be seen in photographs were spaces that held wooden pegs that stabilized the outer stucco.The Taliban soon banned all forms of imagery, music, and sports, including television, in accordance with what they considered a strict interpretation of Sharia.In March 2001, the statues were destroyed by the Taliban of Mullah Omar following a decree issued by him.Abdul Wahed, a Taliban commander operating around the area, announced his intention to blow up the Buddhas in 1997, even before he had taken control of the valley.In 1998 when he battled off the Hizb-i-Wahdat militia from the area and took control of Bamiyan, Wahed drilled holes in the Buddhas' heads for explosives.

Rows of holes that can be seen in photographs were spaces that held wooden pegs that stabilized the outer stucco.

The Taliban soon banned all forms of imagery, music, and sports, including television, in accordance with what they considered a strict interpretation of Sharia.

In March 2001, the statues were destroyed by the Taliban of Mullah Omar following a decree issued by him.

Abdul Wahed, a Taliban commander operating around the area, announced his intention to blow up the Buddhas in 1997, even before he had taken control of the valley.

In 1998 when he battled off the Hizb-i-Wahdat militia from the area and took control of Bamiyan, Wahed drilled holes in the Buddhas' heads for explosives.

monumental statues of Gautam Buddha carved into the side of a cliff in the Bamyan valley in the Hazarajat region of central Afghanistan, 230 kilometres (140 mi) northwest of Kabul at an elevation of 2,500 metres (8,200 ft).