Rockefeller starts fluoridating water

28-Feb-2020 14:25

This is an overview of what is known about the effects of fluoride on developing and erupted teeth, as well as information on the current forms of fluoride delivery.

The goal is to help dental health professionals make informed decisions about fluoride use that maximizes anti-caries benefits.

Caries prevalence increased with age: In the 1999 to 2004 period, 24.2% of children aged 2 to 5 years had caries; and this rose to 49.9% in 6- to 11-year-olds, 57.3% of 12- to 15-year-olds, and 78.2% of 16- to 19-year-olds.

In addition, there was an increase in early childhood caries, when caries occurs between the ages of 2 and 5.

PEP is a bacterial source of energy and a molecule that is necessary for the uptake of sugar, the food source of bacteria.

Plaque that contains just 1 ppm to 5 ppm of fluoride (an amount that is reached by using fluoridated toothpaste) is found to inhibit the adhesion, growth, metabolism, and multiplication of caries-linked oral Streptococci.

After fluoride is ingested, it is distributed from the plasma to all tissues and organs of the body, and it gradually becomes incorporated into the crystal lattice structure of teeth in the form of fluorhydroxyapatite.

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When acidity reaches a p H of 5.5—called the critical p H—saliva and plaque fluid cease to be saturated with calcium and phosphate, thereby permitting the hydroxyapatite in dental enamel to dissolve in a process called demineralization.

When oral p H normalizes after an acid attack and rises again above 5.5, fluoride enhances enamel–dentin remineralization.

If fluoride is no longer available, the oral environment begins to favor demineralization. Fluoride ions inhibit the bacterial enzyme enolase, which interferes with the production of phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP).

Among dentate adults aged 20 to 64, 91% have coronal caries and 14% have root caries.

The role of fluoride in caries prevention is one of the biggest success stories in the field of public health.

When acidity reaches a p H of 5.5—called the critical p H—saliva and plaque fluid cease to be saturated with calcium and phosphate, thereby permitting the hydroxyapatite in dental enamel to dissolve in a process called demineralization.When oral p H normalizes after an acid attack and rises again above 5.5, fluoride enhances enamel–dentin remineralization.If fluoride is no longer available, the oral environment begins to favor demineralization. Fluoride ions inhibit the bacterial enzyme enolase, which interferes with the production of phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP).Among dentate adults aged 20 to 64, 91% have coronal caries and 14% have root caries.The role of fluoride in caries prevention is one of the biggest success stories in the field of public health.In all of these applications, the primary action of fluoride in promoting remineralization and reducing demineralization is due to the presence of fluoride in a beneficial amount and at the right time.