Short story about dating violence

28-May-2020 11:32

In 1993, when my dad was 24 years old, my dad and his whole family received airplane tickets to America to escape the communist takeover in Vietnam. He wanted to learn the English language because he says living in America without knowing most of the words was difficult so he went to West Valley College for two years to learn English. Growing in a small town, when 96 percent of the population is white is tough. Sure, the color of my skin will never be the color of a piece of printer paper but inside it feels like I’m all white. I saved up some money and I took classes from a top music college in Boston, MA but I couldn’t graduate due to my financial situation.

My dad and his family chose to settle in California because he heard the weather was nice and there was a lot of job opportunities in San Jose. FAFSA couldn’t approve my application at that time so I needed to reach into my own pocket to pay my tuition.

I thank American for the opportunities that it has given me and will be forever grateful.

I was born in Iran, and at the age of 10, my family and I absconded from the multi-systemic injustices and immigrated to the US in hopes of extended opportunities and freedom.

I ask you to please continue to fight tyranny and injustice by keeping the conversation going. not by plane, but by freighter ship, crossing the Pacific Ocean and Panama Canal. We came because my parents sought a better life for my brother and me, so they gave up the comfortable one they had.

We cannot allow this president and his administration to change the core American values that have been admired by the world through so many decades of exemplary practices of inclusivity. My parents always said it was because of President Johnson.

I am now in law school working to make sure our systems provide everyone with a fair shot at success and my sister is teaching English helping the next generation learn empathy. He was far from his family in Mexico but convinced a good religious man to build a home for his family and brought his family home to the United States. Graciela Los Angeles After my family got a visa in Yemen, I was so glad that I would be going to the USA. I did not know about immigration until recently and I cried for days. There are so many risk factors that come with being an immigrant but my parents always managed to cope with them.

We honor the sacrifices of our family by trying to make the world a better place. Years later, my mother cleaned others people’s homes and ironed other people’s clothes: neighbors’ homes and clothes, in a middle class neighborhood in a home my father purchased. All my family were happy for us but most of them were crying at the time we left. She was driving to work when a police officer pulled her over because she wasn’t wearing her seat belt. For a single mother that is illegal it’s “I have to go to court, I have to show identification… My father, mother, sister, and I all have our passports. Maria New Jersey I never knew being illegal holds you back from many things you can do here in the states. I stayed 90 days, came home then went back and fell pregnant in August 2005.

After we moved in, there was no more room, so I guess we were lucky.Basam My dad was born in 1968 in Saigon, Vietnam during the Vietnam War. I don’t know how I’m going to pay for college and I want to be an engineer. When I was 1 year old along with my 2 older brothers and my mom. It is hard and it keeps getting harder for some reason. My child was seeing her father on father’s day and meeting her brothers and great grandma. I wanted to visit my uncle who lived in Seattle and thought I might get a bit lucky so then I could get a job and live there.At that time grandpa was a soldier fighting for the South in the Vietnam War. “Yes I believe we should deport all undocumented immigrants here, and they should get in line with all the other people to get their papers… I haven’t seen my father since I was 8 and only spoken to him on the telephone. I don’t even have my workers permit and it sucks to see everyone else getting jobs and licenses when I’m just stuck. I am absolutely disgusted as to what they put my child through. I feel when you find yourself in a situation like this you need to speak to a human being not an automated service. I arrived legally on a tourist visa and I applied for an asylum 3 months after that.We believe that the promise of America can be a reality for all of us. We left Yemen during the beginning of the revolution to change the president. When my friends came over and asked where my father was I said he was “working”. I am now 16 years old and counselors are telling me to start looking for college. I’ve been illegal all my life but found out when I was 15. I lived the life of a normal kid with school and friends and just being a kid. I left of my own accord went back twice in 2006 then again in 2007.Since then people are suffering from lack of food resources. My father told us that we would not stay for a long time in NYC but since the war started in Yemen it’s not safe anymore. So for two years we have been hoping that Yemen will get better and it will be safe so we can go back and see my family after five years of being expatriates. Every year on my birthday he calls me and I try hard not to cry because I know it’s another year of him not being able to see me grow. My sister is a senior and she recently found out that we cannot apply for FAFSA. at the time so he never really had the chance to see me when I was born. When I got older I couldn’t get a normal job or even go to school or even get my first car. When I went to the US last month with my 9yr old whose father is an American citizen I was denied entry on the grounds of an overstay in the past. Vicky Scotland I came to the States for the first time a couple days after I turned 18.

After we moved in, there was no more room, so I guess we were lucky.

Basam My dad was born in 1968 in Saigon, Vietnam during the Vietnam War. I don’t know how I’m going to pay for college and I want to be an engineer. When I was 1 year old along with my 2 older brothers and my mom. It is hard and it keeps getting harder for some reason. My child was seeing her father on father’s day and meeting her brothers and great grandma. I wanted to visit my uncle who lived in Seattle and thought I might get a bit lucky so then I could get a job and live there.

At that time grandpa was a soldier fighting for the South in the Vietnam War. “Yes I believe we should deport all undocumented immigrants here, and they should get in line with all the other people to get their papers… I haven’t seen my father since I was 8 and only spoken to him on the telephone. I don’t even have my workers permit and it sucks to see everyone else getting jobs and licenses when I’m just stuck. I am absolutely disgusted as to what they put my child through. I feel when you find yourself in a situation like this you need to speak to a human being not an automated service. I arrived legally on a tourist visa and I applied for an asylum 3 months after that.

We believe that the promise of America can be a reality for all of us. We left Yemen during the beginning of the revolution to change the president. When my friends came over and asked where my father was I said he was “working”. I am now 16 years old and counselors are telling me to start looking for college. I’ve been illegal all my life but found out when I was 15. I lived the life of a normal kid with school and friends and just being a kid. I left of my own accord went back twice in 2006 then again in 2007.

Since then people are suffering from lack of food resources. My father told us that we would not stay for a long time in NYC but since the war started in Yemen it’s not safe anymore. So for two years we have been hoping that Yemen will get better and it will be safe so we can go back and see my family after five years of being expatriates. Every year on my birthday he calls me and I try hard not to cry because I know it’s another year of him not being able to see me grow. My sister is a senior and she recently found out that we cannot apply for FAFSA. at the time so he never really had the chance to see me when I was born. When I got older I couldn’t get a normal job or even go to school or even get my first car. When I went to the US last month with my 9yr old whose father is an American citizen I was denied entry on the grounds of an overstay in the past. Vicky Scotland I came to the States for the first time a couple days after I turned 18.

I was privileged and fortunate to contribute to the discovery and development of several new cancer drugs that are available for patients today. We had a hard life and he tried to make end meet for us. He is now 24 and about to get out and is facing deportation. He has been convicted of 3 felonies and he has served 6 years in total. They worked long and hard days doing blue-collar jobs so that my parents would have a better chance at life. Since I have been here I’ve formed a family of my own.