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25-Dec-2019 19:17

That's one implication of Jesus' words: Satan is real, has great power, and must be reckoned with seriously and soberly in this age. When Satan wants to have the disciples, he must go to God first.

But a second implication is that Satan's power is by permission from God. That's an important word for our day, because the demonic forces of unreason and insubordination and hate and violence are becoming so strong and ever nearer to home that our faith in God's supremacy may be tested to the limit.

When the enemy is supernatural, so must the weapons be.

We are aliens and exiles in the world not merely because our values differ from those who don't know God, but also because our struggles are different than those who don't know Satan.

" And the Lord said to Satan, "Behold, all that he has is in your power; only upon himself do not put forth your hand." (Job 1:9–12) "Skin for skin, all that a man has he will give for his life.We will need to remember words like these: "Satan demanded to have you," and their meaning: Satan cannot hurt us any more than God permits.This raises a very important and hard theological question: would God grant to his archenemy any of his demands?"Simon, Simon, behold Satan demanded to have you." The first thing to notice here is that the word "you" is plural. In the book of Job Satan is pictured as having access to God and making demands of him.(This is obvious in Greek, not English.) Jesus is telling Simon Peter that Satan has demanded to have all the disciples. Listen to this interchange, which may be typical of how Satan opposes us: Then Satan answered the Lord, "Does Job fear God for nought?

" And the Lord said to Satan, "Behold, all that he has is in your power; only upon himself do not put forth your hand." (Job 1:9–12) "Skin for skin, all that a man has he will give for his life.

We will need to remember words like these: "Satan demanded to have you," and their meaning: Satan cannot hurt us any more than God permits.

This raises a very important and hard theological question: would God grant to his archenemy any of his demands?

"Simon, Simon, behold Satan demanded to have you." The first thing to notice here is that the word "you" is plural. In the book of Job Satan is pictured as having access to God and making demands of him.

(This is obvious in Greek, not English.) Jesus is telling Simon Peter that Satan has demanded to have all the disciples. Listen to this interchange, which may be typical of how Satan opposes us: Then Satan answered the Lord, "Does Job fear God for nought?

Jesus calls him the "prince" or "ruler of this world" (John ), and Paul calls him the "god of this age" (2 Corinthians 4:4) and the "ruler of the authority of the air" (Ephesians 2:2).