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14-Nov-2019 02:11

These two pages summarise what Corder wrote about the history of the many 'Austin' businesses & companies over the years, as you can see here. It would seem that the shipyard came into existence way back in 1826! Founded by Peter Austin, born in 1770, whose name this site knows because he was in 1805, I understand, a partner with Samuel Moore in the Wear Pottery & had earlier than 1805 been trained in the pottery business by Robert Fairbairns at High Pottery in Newbottle, located just a few miles away from Sunderland. Austin and Son' does not seem to make sense - where perhaps 'S. (A graving dock is, for those like me who do not know these things, is a multi-purpose dry-dock, which can be used for a variety of purposes - for new ship building, for ship repair, & for ship maintenance. In 1888, the vessel was hulked (which is this case means converted to a lighter), at Melbourne, & became 243 tons only. Name changed to Birchgrove - earlier than 1910, but was it truly so? Nicholas, of Ballarat (near Melbourne), as the then owner of the 219 ton Birch Grove.

(Watson) Corder (1867/1953), whose lifetime work is now held in the Sunderland Central Library. There was, it would seem, another partnership, named 'S. A 300 foot graving dock, opened in 1870, took its place.

Entitled 'Shipbuilding & Repairing' & covering the history of the shipyard from 1826 to 1954. 'Ritson & Co.' presumably later changed their name & by the 1876/77 register, 'F. At this point, I am unable to tell you what finally happened to her.

That is good information, but can anyone tell us exactly where 'Dame Dolly's rock' was located? And in 1897 they expanded westwards to take over a bottling plant located, it would seem, immediately to the east of the Sunderland road bridge. Every time I read new data, many changes are required to the data which is already on site! But do, by all means, view the original e Bay image as was offered by vendor 'claudiacaroline' - the card is long sold. I cannot, alas, tell you the origin of the image which was provided to the webmaster by a site visitor. Whidby her captain, thru 1869/70, but that clearly is not correct. Pegg, of London, initially for service ex Sunderland, soon London to China, & Liverpool to Singapore. were her new owners for service to Australia ex London & Liverpool.

It would be good to have one or two of those images on site, wouldn't it! Which list includes unnumbered vessels built as much as 43 years prior to the very first Miramar listing.

The main Austin yard would however seem to have been just a short distance away, on the same bank & a little closer to the sea. Names of just a few of the vessels constructed by 'Austin' of Sunderland - added as I happen to spot references to them.

A sign at the site today, shown here (& in the image strip above), in an Alan Collie image, advises us that the pontoon was towed half way around the world to a shipyard in Hong Kong a year or so after the 'Austin' ship building yard was closed. Now it is really not for the webmaster to criticise from afar re such matters, but the sign looks to my eye to be have been 'low budget' - a more distinguished sign, perhaps illustrating the pontoon, might better have been commissioned in the first place to commemorate such a significant part of the city's history.

Certainly the sign, in the summer of 2011, was in urgent need of repair or replacement.

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Visible to all who crossed that bridge, since they just had to look down to see the pontoon & its activity laid out before them. There must be hundreds if not thousands of photos of the pontoon, 'out there' somewhere, taken by passers-by over 60 or more years. In a snippet of data, I read that the yard made a net profit of 51,900 in the year to Apl. And on this site, at page 140 is a list of 'Austin' built vessels, starting in 1831 & ending in 1959. A 2 masted sailing ship carrying square sails & a trysail on a small jackmast. A list of the Sunderland shipbuilders referenced in these pages is a little lower on page 040. This was on ground called Nova Scotia, near Dame Dolly's rock.' Brian Dodds states, however, that not only was the site called Nova Scotia, additionally the shipyard itself was called 'Nova Scotia' & was at Sand Point, near Dame Dolly's Rock, which rock was so named as it was the viewpoint from which Dame Dorothy Williamson and her maids would gather to watch ships sailing out to sea. I read that in 1874 they started a branch yard with G. Hunter, who later went across to the Tyne to start Swan Hunter's yard. Hunter, famous for his leadership role in what became Swan, Hunter & Wigham Richardson, Ltd., of Wallsend-on-Tyne. In 1890 they expanded into shipbuilding premises previously owned by John Hutchinson which included two small graving docks. I suspect, however, that he was Chairman in relatively recent years (by that I mean the 1940s or 1950s), though exactly when it was I do not presently know. A 'webmaster modified' version of the e Bay image is next, available in a slightly larger size here. Next is a simply splendid image of the pontoon & yard in Jun. An even larger version of the image is available by clicking the image. In 1856, per Turnbull's Register, & in Christie's Shipping Register of 1858 the vessel was owned by Thomas Wilson, & Wm. Now LR continues to record 'Wilson' as the vessel's owner & J. Not sure why Internet Explorer cannot identify the applet as being harmless) Corrections in any of the material which follows, however tiny, would be most welcome. PETER AUSTIN (1) (1826-1846)PETER AUSTIN (2) (1846-1860? For simplicity, I will call them Peter Austin (1) & Peter Austin (2). In 1846 Peter Austin (1) retired and his son, Peter Austin (2) 'crossed to the site now occupied by the Company, where he conducted the business on his own account'. Which site was previously occupied by a bottle works which had gone bankrupt. I am most sympathetic with the difficult of assembling accurate data so far into the past. And 'Samuel Peter Austin' of the third generation & his father entered into a partnership in 1860 entitled S. The yard expanded eastwards into premises previously occupied by John Denniston (& William Pearson before him). So we know roughly the dating of the image that follows. Grice of Sunderland as the owner of the 543 ton vessel. I previously noted one voyage reference to Australia but there probably are many. Another site page offers literature published by 'Austin', photographs etc. They surely will now need further revision to incorporate data published in 'A & P News', the employee magazine of Austin & Pickersgill Limited, specifically in issue No. Alan Vickers has kindly provided scans of two pages from that issue, a two-page spread about the history of the collective 'Austin', derived from the manuscripts of James W. The reference to 'Mills' is apparently to George and John Mills. The 'old slipway', which I presume means the one built in 1846, 'together with rails, cogs, cods, and cradles was taken up and shipped to a buyer in Helsingfors'. AUSTIN LTD.(1826/1954 - originally founded in 1826, in 1954 became a part of 'Austin & Pickersgill Limited.')Can you help with the history of this company? A part at least of that history would surely be contained in a small 1954 volume of oblong format, published by 'S. Austin & Son, Ltd.' (as per the cover of the volume) or maybe by 'S. A copy of the volume was sold via e Bay for GBP 40.00, in early Sep. The paragraphs that follow have been revised & re-revised over the years as new data has been located. It would seem that there were major changes in 1869 & in the following years as the yard was extended again & again as wooden shipbuilding came to an end & iron shipbuilding became the norm. Now the webmaster has a number of 'Lloyd's Registers' ex 'Google' books available to him (image at left) for what would appear to be most of Thomas Wood's life. But we can tell you that the ship's bell has survived, & a composite image of it is at left, thanks to a kindly site visitor.

Visible to all who crossed that bridge, since they just had to look down to see the pontoon & its activity laid out before them. There must be hundreds if not thousands of photos of the pontoon, 'out there' somewhere, taken by passers-by over 60 or more years. In a snippet of data, I read that the yard made a net profit of 51,900 in the year to Apl. And on this site, at page 140 is a list of 'Austin' built vessels, starting in 1831 & ending in 1959. A 2 masted sailing ship carrying square sails & a trysail on a small jackmast.

A list of the Sunderland shipbuilders referenced in these pages is a little lower on page 040. This was on ground called Nova Scotia, near Dame Dolly's rock.' Brian Dodds states, however, that not only was the site called Nova Scotia, additionally the shipyard itself was called 'Nova Scotia' & was at Sand Point, near Dame Dolly's Rock, which rock was so named as it was the viewpoint from which Dame Dorothy Williamson and her maids would gather to watch ships sailing out to sea. I read that in 1874 they started a branch yard with G. Hunter, who later went across to the Tyne to start Swan Hunter's yard. Hunter, famous for his leadership role in what became Swan, Hunter & Wigham Richardson, Ltd., of Wallsend-on-Tyne. In 1890 they expanded into shipbuilding premises previously owned by John Hutchinson which included two small graving docks. I suspect, however, that he was Chairman in relatively recent years (by that I mean the 1940s or 1950s), though exactly when it was I do not presently know. A 'webmaster modified' version of the e Bay image is next, available in a slightly larger size here. Next is a simply splendid image of the pontoon & yard in Jun. An even larger version of the image is available by clicking the image. In 1856, per Turnbull's Register, & in Christie's Shipping Register of 1858 the vessel was owned by Thomas Wilson, & Wm. Now LR continues to record 'Wilson' as the vessel's owner & J.

Not sure why Internet Explorer cannot identify the applet as being harmless) Corrections in any of the material which follows, however tiny, would be most welcome. PETER AUSTIN (1) (1826-1846)PETER AUSTIN (2) (1846-1860? For simplicity, I will call them Peter Austin (1) & Peter Austin (2). In 1846 Peter Austin (1) retired and his son, Peter Austin (2) 'crossed to the site now occupied by the Company, where he conducted the business on his own account'. Which site was previously occupied by a bottle works which had gone bankrupt. I am most sympathetic with the difficult of assembling accurate data so far into the past. And 'Samuel Peter Austin' of the third generation & his father entered into a partnership in 1860 entitled S. The yard expanded eastwards into premises previously occupied by John Denniston (& William Pearson before him). So we know roughly the dating of the image that follows. Grice of Sunderland as the owner of the 543 ton vessel. I previously noted one voyage reference to Australia but there probably are many.

Another site page offers literature published by 'Austin', photographs etc. They surely will now need further revision to incorporate data published in 'A & P News', the employee magazine of Austin & Pickersgill Limited, specifically in issue No. Alan Vickers has kindly provided scans of two pages from that issue, a two-page spread about the history of the collective 'Austin', derived from the manuscripts of James W. The reference to 'Mills' is apparently to George and John Mills. The 'old slipway', which I presume means the one built in 1846, 'together with rails, cogs, cods, and cradles was taken up and shipped to a buyer in Helsingfors'.

AUSTIN LTD.(1826/1954 - originally founded in 1826, in 1954 became a part of 'Austin & Pickersgill Limited.')Can you help with the history of this company? A part at least of that history would surely be contained in a small 1954 volume of oblong format, published by 'S. Austin & Son, Ltd.' (as per the cover of the volume) or maybe by 'S. A copy of the volume was sold via e Bay for GBP 40.00, in early Sep. The paragraphs that follow have been revised & re-revised over the years as new data has been located. It would seem that there were major changes in 1869 & in the following years as the yard was extended again & again as wooden shipbuilding came to an end & iron shipbuilding became the norm. Now the webmaster has a number of 'Lloyd's Registers' ex 'Google' books available to him (image at left) for what would appear to be most of Thomas Wood's life. But we can tell you that the ship's bell has survived, & a composite image of it is at left, thanks to a kindly site visitor.

And perhaps, if it is replaced, consideration might just be given to improving the wording? The 'pontoon' used to be located at bottom left of the image that follows, parallel of course to the river bank.