Tegan and sara dating history

29-Nov-2019 21:26

We don’t really write together, and we live separate lives when we’re not on the road.For now, I really like being able to write songs and then give them to Tegan and have her fill in the holes.I assume that we’re going to live long, healthy, happy lives, and I’m sure we’ll branch out at some point, but we’re not rushing into anything. I read that your mom said she thought being a gay musician meant you had a rough path ahead of you. At the time, I absolutely, 100 percent thought that she was right, and I felt it myself.You’ve described yourself as being 45 and Tegan as being closer to 19. When we were writing the songs on the album, Tegan was doing a lot of traveling, meeting up with friends, drinking and partying, and she was single, so she was kind of behaving like a 15-year-old. Before the Internet, there wasn’t really a way to discover a community.I always felt limited on the guitar, but through exploration of sounds in keyboard land, I’ve been able to really change and develop ideas on the guitar that mimic the melodies I like to create on keys.

tegan and sara dating history-22

GO: The Con in many ways has a darker sound than some of your previous albums. Sara Quin: I feel like a lot of that has to do with production.

A lot of the album was written when she was falling in love and having her heart broken. Do you remember the first time you actually came out and told someone, “I’m gay”? I usually just told people who I was dating, and then they would ask, “Are you gay? You don’t just go to a bar and find [someone] and socialize that way.

And I was at home—I bought a place—and I was like Suzie Homemaker, settling in and bitching about my taxes and watering my plants. So I completely agreed with my mom at the time, but certainly it’s gotten easier.

I was like the oldest 26-year-old on the face of the planet, at least in my mind. In North America and parts of Europe and Australia, sexuality is becoming less and less of an issue as time goes by, but it’s still tough sometimes.

So the record was written from two completely different perspectives. I don’t feel like I neglect that part of who I am, but it’s a fine line to walk, especially in the rock community that we’re a part of.

GO: The Con in many ways has a darker sound than some of your previous albums. Sara Quin: I feel like a lot of that has to do with production.

A lot of the album was written when she was falling in love and having her heart broken. Do you remember the first time you actually came out and told someone, “I’m gay”? I usually just told people who I was dating, and then they would ask, “Are you gay? You don’t just go to a bar and find [someone] and socialize that way.

And I was at home—I bought a place—and I was like Suzie Homemaker, settling in and bitching about my taxes and watering my plants. So I completely agreed with my mom at the time, but certainly it’s gotten easier.

I was like the oldest 26-year-old on the face of the planet, at least in my mind. In North America and parts of Europe and Australia, sexuality is becoming less and less of an issue as time goes by, but it’s still tough sometimes.

So the record was written from two completely different perspectives. I don’t feel like I neglect that part of who I am, but it’s a fine line to walk, especially in the rock community that we’re a part of.

I loved working with producers John [Collins] and Dave [Carswell] on our previous albums, but they tend to have a more ’60s/’70s jangle to their sound. I think that had a huge influence on the songs we were writing and the sounds we were creating in the studio.