The joint commission oral liquid dating

17-Apr-2020 10:22

Some patients may have multiple tubing lines connected to them for reasons such as delivery of medication and nutrition therapy.

With these multiple lines, the potential for tubing misconnections becomes more prevalent.

These connectors contribute to misconnections because they allow functionally dissimilar tubes or catheters to be connected together.

Between January 2008 and September 2009, 36 events of tubing misconnections were reported to the Pennsylvania Patient Safety Authority involving various types of misconnections.

The Sentinel Event Alert describes the types of tubing and catheter misconnections reported to Joint Commission, including central intravenous catheters, peripheral intravenous catheters, nasogastric feeding tubes, tracheostomy cuff inflation tubes, and automatic blood pressure cuff insufflation tubes.The physician was notified and discovered that the tube feeding was connected to the sump instead of the jejunal feeding tube . National and international standards address connector design to minimize misconnections; however, for many technologies, these standards have been neither widely adopted nor fully successful.will aim to reduce misconnections by addressing design requirements for small bore connectors for liquids and gases in healthcare applications.The Alert also described misconnection events reported to U. Pharmacopeia (USP), including intravenous infusions connected to epidural lines and infusions intended for IV delivery connected to nasogastric tubes.There are many types of misconnections; however, this article will focus on liquid-to-liquid and liquid-to-gas misconnections because these misconnections can pose the most serious harm to patients and are the most frequently reported to the Pennsylvania Patient Safety Authority.

The Sentinel Event Alert describes the types of tubing and catheter misconnections reported to Joint Commission, including central intravenous catheters, peripheral intravenous catheters, nasogastric feeding tubes, tracheostomy cuff inflation tubes, and automatic blood pressure cuff insufflation tubes.

The physician was notified and discovered that the tube feeding was connected to the sump instead of the jejunal feeding tube . National and international standards address connector design to minimize misconnections; however, for many technologies, these standards have been neither widely adopted nor fully successful.

will aim to reduce misconnections by addressing design requirements for small bore connectors for liquids and gases in healthcare applications.

The Alert also described misconnection events reported to U. Pharmacopeia (USP), including intravenous infusions connected to epidural lines and infusions intended for IV delivery connected to nasogastric tubes.

There are many types of misconnections; however, this article will focus on liquid-to-liquid and liquid-to-gas misconnections because these misconnections can pose the most serious harm to patients and are the most frequently reported to the Pennsylvania Patient Safety Authority.

A common reason for tubing misconnections, whether liquid-to-liquid or liquid-to-gas, is that many types of tubing lines for different medical devices incorporate common luer connectors. The tubings [sic] were connected incorrectly, and the patient received one narcotic epidural (ordered via PCA) and the other narcotic via PCA (ordered via epidural).