Tintype dating a

29-Feb-2020 04:37

" to 1" wide and 1" high made possible by the use of a multi-lens camera with repeating back which therefore could produce multiple exposures on a single photographic plate.In terms of quantity, the gem was the most prolifically produced form of photograph in the 1860s in America.Aside from the speed of its production, the gem was also inexpensive and its small size made it suitable for mounting in jewellery such as lockets and broaches.Like daguerreotypes and ambrotypes before it, hand colouring was also possible and rouging of the subject's cheeks was the most common form of this.Business must have done well as he next opened another studio in Boston, MA at 4 Summer St.Wing was granted a patent for a photographic card mount for tintypes on October 13, 1863.

Masury had a studio located on 289 Washington St., Boston, and he was producing cartes de visite there by 1868. Most mounts used at the time however do not attribute any patent rights.

Although the studio traded under the name of Wing & Allen it was apparently run by Otis M.

Gove (b.1851 Seabrook, NH) who had come from Boston where he had worked for Simon Wing.

Wing & Allen's Ferrotype Gallery opened at 342 Kearny St, near Pine, San Francisco in 1873 and was apparently run by Bennett G. The studio was located at 523 Kearny St by 1876 and moved again to 521 Kearny St.

The former address was occupied by William Shew from 1879. Allen's death the business was continued by his wife who is listed as the manager of the Wing and Allen studio, again operating from 342 Kearny St from 1884 trading as Allen and Hay, Mrs. Hay but the union was dissolved 28 September 1886 with Mrs. Lalla Allen then formed Allen & Company with Nathaniel Weston in 1887-1888.

Masury had a studio located on 289 Washington St., Boston, and he was producing cartes de visite there by 1868. Most mounts used at the time however do not attribute any patent rights.

Although the studio traded under the name of Wing & Allen it was apparently run by Otis M.

Gove (b.1851 Seabrook, NH) who had come from Boston where he had worked for Simon Wing.

Wing & Allen's Ferrotype Gallery opened at 342 Kearny St, near Pine, San Francisco in 1873 and was apparently run by Bennett G. The studio was located at 523 Kearny St by 1876 and moved again to 521 Kearny St.

The former address was occupied by William Shew from 1879. Allen's death the business was continued by his wife who is listed as the manager of the Wing and Allen studio, again operating from 342 Kearny St from 1884 trading as Allen and Hay, Mrs. Hay but the union was dissolved 28 September 1886 with Mrs. Lalla Allen then formed Allen & Company with Nathaniel Weston in 1887-1888.

Eventually failing to win in a high court case, Wing had to put up with other players entering the field and multiplying cameras comparable to his own were eventually made by the American Optical Company and E. Wing's Photograph & Ferrotype Rooms operated in in Toledo, Ohio from 1869-1882 and a studio in Freemont, Ohio operated in 1883.