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12-Jun-2020 18:19

That day, she might even have been wearing what’s known as the “full-in start-up twin set”: a Second Life T-shirt paired with a Second Life hoodie.

In short, everything about her indicated that she was a serious technical person.

The companies contended that such statistics were a trade secret, and that exposing them would hurt their competitive edge.

But Chou was not the only voice calling for transparency.

This past June, 33 companies signed a pledge to make their workforces more diverse.A 2010 study, “The Paradox of Meritocracy in Organizations,” found that in cultures that espouse meritocracy, managers may in fact “show greater bias in favor of men over equally performing women.” In a series of three experiments, the researchers presented participants with profiles of similarly performing individuals of both genders, and asked them to award bonuses.The researchers found that telling participants that their company valued merit-based decisions only increased the likelihood of their giving higher bonuses to the men.According to Nancy Lee, Google’s vice president of people operations until she retired in February, the company saw both a business imperative—it is, after all, designing a global product—and a moral one.She points to the “original vision” of Google’s founders, which was that “we’re going to build this company for the long haul.

This past June, 33 companies signed a pledge to make their workforces more diverse.

A 2010 study, “The Paradox of Meritocracy in Organizations,” found that in cultures that espouse meritocracy, managers may in fact “show greater bias in favor of men over equally performing women.” In a series of three experiments, the researchers presented participants with profiles of similarly performing individuals of both genders, and asked them to award bonuses.

The researchers found that telling participants that their company valued merit-based decisions only increased the likelihood of their giving higher bonuses to the men.

According to Nancy Lee, Google’s vice president of people operations until she retired in February, the company saw both a business imperative—it is, after all, designing a global product—and a moral one.

She points to the “original vision” of Google’s founders, which was that “we’re going to build this company for the long haul.

Eric and Red are often at odds but there is an understanding between them when there has to be. Attempts to be as cheery as possible, despite her son's constant snarking, her daughter's obvious sluttiness and disdain, and her husband's unending grumpiness. Seems to suppress a lot of unpleasant thoughts in order to keep her bright personality.